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Station 1 - Jesus Is Condemned to Death

Updated: Feb 21

Artwork by Matt Thulson, Graphite on 11" x 14" paper

Poem by Karl Helvig


We are glad you made it to the website for Centennial Covenant’s Church’s podcast, "Centered." This podcast was created by Karl Helvig, David Dillon, and Kaley Rodda, but with the help of many other wonderful people. The content below is meant to be a guide for practicing the prayer known as, The Stations of the Cross. You can use this website on its own without the audio (and, we would like to note that we designed this particularly with our friends in the D/HH community in mind) or you can use this website while also listening to the audio to create a more immersive experience. The experience here is exactly the same as the experience of the audio on the podcast and they each function either independently or together.


Before reflecting on and responding to the artwork for today’s Station of the Cross, take a moment now to pause. We’d encourage you to move slowly through each part of this exercise, beginning with the breaths you are about to take.


Take two or three deep breaths.

Breathe.

Breathe

Breathe.


Notice your physical body. Are you carrying tension anywhere? Are you uncomfortable anywhere in your posture. Give yourself a moment to relax. Let your mind be still.


As you continue to breathe naturally and sit comfortably, read these words from Mark 15:12-15.


“What shall I do, then, with the one you call the king of the Jews?” Pilate asked them.

“Crucify him!” they shouted.

“Why? What crime has he committed?” asked Pilate.

But they shouted all the louder, “Crucify him!”

Wanting to satisfy the crowd, Pilate released Barabbas to them. He had Jesus flogged, and handed him over to be crucified.



When you feel ready, scroll down the page. You will be guided through a reflection on today’s Station of the cross. The reflection is centered on a piece of art created by Matt Thulson.


Go ahead and scroll down to the artwork now.



First, take one minute to simply sit with the image and take in all its details.


For the next three questions, take your time in processing or responding to each. Let this be a leisurely practice. There is no rush. There is benefit to creating space for reflection and prayer.


  • Is there a particular part of the art that captures your attention? If so, let your attention linger there. Take it in all the more.


  • As you continue engaging with this art, does it stir up any emotions in you? Take some time to sit with those emotions. Offer them in prayer to God.


  • Either by speaking out loud or in writing, capture your responses to this Station of the Cross. Note any observations you have about why certain aspects of the art stood out to you or why you felt the emotions you did.



After giving yourself ample time for reflection. Read one more time the words of Mark 15, from which this image was inspired.


“What shall I do, then, with the one you call the king of the Jews?” Pilate asked them.

“Crucify him!” they shouted.

“Why? What crime has he committed?” asked Pilate.

But they shouted all the louder, “Crucify him!”

Wanting to satisfy the crowd, Pilate released Barabbas to them. He had Jesus flogged, and handed him over to be crucified.

Does anything from this passage strike you in a new way after reflecting on the artwork?

Read this response written by Karl Helvig:

Crowds


Crowds confuse

Even conceal at times

True thoughts and

Trustworthy attitudes of heart and mind.


Screaming voices

Speaking wild words

Seem

Sane if unexamined.


Crowds have power


When words of life are lifted

Wondrous beauty arises

Like songs sung or

Sentiments shared.


When words of condemnation

Wounds are inflicted

Like hatred hewn from stone

Heavy burdens laid on backs.


Am I part of any screaming crowds?


“Crucify Him!”

They cried.

Words causing

Wounds

A self-justified crowd

Seeking justice of their own creation.


Weighing choices and

“Wanting to satisfy the crowd,”

Pilot poignantly

Proceeds with their plan

Pacifying a crazed crowds’ passion

Precedeeding the passion.


Would I have been swept up in that crowd?





Take a final minute of silence and, when you are ready, conclude your time with this simple prayer:

Jesus, you made this journey for me. Amen.






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