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Station 8 - Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem

Updated: Mar 15

Artwork by Megan Rodda

Poem by Kaley Rodda


Welcome to the website for Centennial Covenant Church’s podcast Centered. This podcast was created by Karl Helvig, David Dillon, and Kaley Rodda, with the help of many other wonderful people. The content below is a guide for the prayer practice known as The Stations of the Cross, and this website was designed particularly with our friends in the D/HH community in mind. You can use it on its own without the audio podcast, or you can use the website while listening to the podcast to create a more immersive experience. The content here is exactly the same as that on the audio podcast. In other words, this website and the podcast can function either independently or together.


Before we go into the practice, you are invited to find a comfortable posture. Whether seated, or lying down, or standing up - take a minute to simply let your body find stillness.


Our body and our soul are somehow interconnected. So by stilling our bodies - releasing the tension from our neck, our shoulders, our backs - we can often find we also come to a little more stillness in our souls.


Once you’re settled, take two or three nice, deep breaths.


Reflect now on this passage from the Gospel of Luke 23:27-28:


A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children.”


Read also these words from Tony Jones in his book The Sacred Way:


Jesus broke so many barriers for his day: He touched lepers, he healed on the Sabbath, and he spoke to women in public. Jesus ignored traditions that were oppressive, and he stood up to the authorities who challenged him. And now the women of Jerusalem show their gratitude by meeting Jesus along the way and crying over his fate. Earlier, Jesus prophesied that the women of Jerusalem would weep for him, and now that prophecy is fulfilled.




Now bring your attention to the artwork. Notice the features, big and small, and see where your eyes are drawn.


What is capturing your attention?


What is the emotion in this piece? Do you feel empathy for the subject?


How is this image reflected in your own life? Can you look at the image itself and relate it to your personal experience? Is there some piece of it that reminds you of you, or someone you know?


Continue to reflect, as you read the scripture again:


A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children.”


Consider this written reflection by Kaley Rodda:


Worry for you and your children


I worry if I have daughters.


I fear having to explain to them why this society is built against them

How to avoid becoming just a statistic. Another face on the forefront of injustice.


Who is this man that acknowledges my struggles

When my society would rather silence

Ignore them.

Minimize them.


Who is this man

That spoke directly to women

As if their inequality wasn’t at the center of Roman culture

As if they had thoughts

More than just feelings

More than just tasks and fulfilling others needs.


My God acknowledges me.

He sees me,

my suffering is valid.

And in his last moments, he worries for me.

A woman.


Your love isn’t ashamed to be seen with me

And it's not in bite sized amounts

It is abundant

It is whole

Like how I am in your presence



How are you going to respond? Whenever we create space to reflect and to process, it only increases the impact that God can have on our lives. Consider writing your own written response, which you can share here on the website. Grace and Peace.

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